30
Apr 04

Bugs. Bugs. Bugs. Why Testing is a first class job.

Ryan Lowe makes a good argument why Testing is a First Class Job. Resonates with my post regarding Bugs. Bugs. Bugs. and offers lots of detailed insight.


30
Apr 04

Notepad.exe on steroids.

Notepad 2. freeware. Syntax-Highlighting etc. (via shahine.com/omar/)


29
Apr 04

Smalltalk for MacOS X

A new Smalltalk for MacOS X. I hope these guys will be more successful than QKS in the early 90s.


28
Apr 04

Compilers and Compiler Generators

Compilers and Compiler Generators.
Great read for everyone interested in compilers. Of course, it’s only an introductory text, but still useful.


28
Apr 04

Awesome.

A robot solving rubik’s 3×3 cube – build with LEGO.


27
Apr 04

Software for Small Business

Frank Sommers asks: At the network’s edge, is software a service business?.
Interesting enough, German ISVs targeting the SOHO markets are fighting with this problem since the early 80s. Looks like a great opportunity for us ­čÖé


27
Apr 04

Bugs. Bugs. Bugs.

Keith Pitty and Charles Miller have some very useful thoughts on software testing and finding bugs.
Automated software tests taking care of possible regressions are extremly important, especially if you intend to release often. However, automated tests are not an after-thought, neither unit-tests nor acceptance-tests. If you change the fundamental algorithmn, you are not finished as long as the unit tests don’t reflect the new/different boundary conditions. If you add a new feature, you’re not done as long as you’ve added a new acceptance test covering the feature. This requires a lot of discipline on behalf of the developers. Plus it requires patience on behalf of management, because changing the algorithmn/implementing the feature will take a little bit longer than expected. Last but not least, having automated tests provides a great starting point for external testers, ensuring they don’t complain about those nasty regressions.
Having external software testers is vital to find the bugs in areas/paths not vovered by automated tests (most likely the majority of bugs). Developers test their code to see if it works the way they think it should work. They’re testing with knowledge of the code written a couple of minutes ago. They want to see it work, not fail – after all, who want’s to see his/her work fails? External testers expect the code to deliver the results they expect. Plus, they want to see the code fail, which, BTW, create a significant tension between the two camps. Make sure to remind everyone involved that both teams are working together to deliver a great product.
Keith makes a good point about over-reliance on automated tests. However, note that you got to have a comprehensive suite of automated tests first, covering all the regressions you want to avoid by all means. Then start worrying about over-reliance on automated tests. But not the other way round.


25
Apr 04

A trip down memory lane…

Scans of Apple publications from the very beginning to the 90s.


21
Apr 04

Cool.

Very nice photo blog covering the Smoky Mountains (via Critical section).


20
Apr 04

AiBook

Finally, my AiBook, 1.25GHZ, 1GB RAM, 80GB drive arrived.
It feels great. The system is way more responsive than my old TiBook 866. However, due to some misconfiguration in CodeWarrior, builds are about 8% slower on the AiBook. Haven’t figured out why, yet.
Putting all connectors like USB, Firewire etc. on the left & right side of the unit instead of putting them on the back is a major design flaw. The backlit keyboard is cool, though.
Haven’t tried the Bluetooth connectivity to my P900 phone, yet.
Looks like it’s running cooler than the old TiBook, too.